In memory of

 

Nazila, 5 (or 6)

5 other civilians (incl. a 15-yr-old girl) 

died in middle of day of October 17, 2001

in the Microrayon apartment housing complex in central Kabul. Nazila was playing with friends in the yard of her apartment block (No. 33). Suddenly, a U.S bomb exploded at a Taliban camp a few hundred meters from her home. Panic-stricken, Nazila and the other children sought refuge indoors. A second U.S “precision” bomb fell, though failing to explode and burying itself less than one meter from the entrance to the house where Nazila wanted to find protection. The bomb made part of a wall collapse, burying Nazila beneath it. “She was a very beautiful child,” says her mother, Shakila Noori. Now she is dead leaving an emptiness which threatens to swallow the whole Noori family. Since Nazila’s death, the father, Abdul, has been “sick in the head” in Shakila’s words. The second daughter, Suvita, 4, cries constantly, pleading for her sister in between tears. Suhrab,a 6-yr-old son, wakes up at night by nightmares of planes and bombs. Their mother, Shakila, has her own problems. She says, “with my nerves and my head.” When asked whether a doctor is treating her, she simply does to a cupboard and gets out a small bottle of nevrozine syrup. Months later, the Noori family was visited by a U.S delegation. They gave the surviving children a football, a small box of felt-tip pens, and a cuddly bear. But since the visit, Ahmed and Shakila have heard nothing. All but two of the felt pens have dried up and the cuddly toy is now also battered. Another U.S bomb that morning landed in the road, yet another hit two houses, killing five people, including a 15-yr-old girl. Shakila said about Nazila, “people used to stop me on the street and say how beautiful she was. I would like to show the Americans this photo of her and try to explain how sad we feel.” The parents also called her Sweeta. Sweeta loved to try on nail polish and sing. An Agence France-Presse reporter who visited the Microrayon neighborhood soon after the U.S “precision” bombs had fallen, said a bomb left a crater 20 feet wide and so deep in the road it had broken the water table several meters below (see photo at: http://www.tribuneindia.com/2001/20011019/photos/pages/19photo26.htm ). The U.S bomb also injured Laila (38)’s daughter, Khatira. The U.S target was ostensibly a Taliban camp six blocks away. Al Jazeera’s Taysir al-Allouni provided live TV-coverage from Macroyan which showed huge bomb craters and piles of rubble. It also showed what appeared to be a dead child covered in dust and a blanket lying on a bed frame. One man covered in dust was pointing to a pile saying that his mother and several relatives had been inside the building. In another building, an 18-yr-old man and his bride of a few days were killed along with their family. At least four large “precision” bombs exploded in the apartment complex.

Four “precision” 500 lb GBU-12 bombs